COVID-19 Response: Local Logistics     National Effort       

Systematic identification of CAZymes and transcription factors in the hypercellulolytic fungus Penicillium funiculosum NCIM1228 involved in lignocellulosic biomass degradation [Next Gen Genomics Facility]

You are here

COVID-19 Response: Local Logistics     National Effort

TitleSystematic identification of CAZymes and transcription factors in the hypercellulolytic fungus Penicillium funiculosum NCIM1228 involved in lignocellulosic biomass degradation [Next Gen Genomics Facility]
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2023
AuthorsPasari N, Gupta M, Sinha T, Ogunmolu FEmmanuel, Yazdani SShams
JournalBiotechnol Biofuels Bioprod
Volume16
Issue1
Pagination150
Date Published2023 Oct 04
ISSN2731-3654
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Penicillium funiculosum NCIM1228 is a filamentous fungus that was identified in our laboratory to have high cellulolytic activity. Analysis of its secretome suggested that it responds to different carbon substrates by secreting specific enzymes capable of digesting those substrates. This phenomenon indicated the presence of a regulatory system guiding the expression of these hydrolyzing enzymes. Since transcription factors (TFs) are the key players in regulating the expression of enzymes, this study aimed first to identify the complete repertoire of Carbohydrate Active Enzymes (CAZymes) and TFs coded in its genome. The regulation of CAZymes was then analysed by studying the expression pattern of these CAZymes and TFs in different carbon substrates-Avicel (cellulosic substrate), wheat bran (WB; hemicellulosic substrate), Avicel + wheat bran, pre-treated wheat straw (a potential substrate for lignocellulosic ethanol), and glucose (control).

RESULTS: The P. funiculosum NCIM1228 genome was sequenced, and 10,739 genes were identified in its genome. These genes included a total of 298 CAZymes and 451 TF coding genes. A distinct expression pattern of the CAZymes was observed in different carbon substrates tested. Core cellulose hydrolyzing enzymes were highly expressed in the presence of Avicel, while pre-treated wheat straw and Avicel + wheat bran induced a mixture of CAZymes because of their heterogeneous nature. Wheat bran mainly induced hemicellulases, and the least number of CAZymes were expressed in glucose. TFs also exhibited distinct expression patterns in each of the carbon substrates. Though most of these TFs have not been functionally characterized before, homologs of NosA, Fcr1, and ATF21, which have been known to be involved in fruiting body development, protein secretion and stress response, were identified.

CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the P. funiculosum NCIM1228 genome was sequenced, and the CAZymes and TFs present in its genome were annotated. The expression of the CAZymes and TFs in response to various polymeric sugars present in the lignocellulosic biomass was identified. This work thus provides a comprehensive mapping of transcription factors (TFs) involved in regulating the production of biomass hydrolyzing enzymes.

DOI10.1186/s13068-023-02399-9
Alternate JournalBiotechnol Biofuels Bioprod
PubMed ID37794424
PubMed Central IDPMC10552389
Grant ListBT/PR/Centre/03/2011-Phase II / / Department of Biotechnology, Ministry of Science and Technology, India /